Probiotic All-Flora delivers 5 billion CFU (colony forming units) of friendly bacteria and 5 billion CFU of beneficial yeast that work in synergy to balance your total microbiome. Our formulation is optimized to support healthy immune defenses and promote digestive health including bowel regularity and the reduction of occasional gas, bloating, diarrhea, and constipation.* All in just one capsule daily. Great for travel and times of GI distress, too. Shelf-stable, no refrigeration required.

DNA Shift is a once-daily, powerful probiotic delivering 50 billion CFUs and 11 probiotic strains. It’s perfect for both men and women who want to improve their gut and brain health. With long-term use, you may even see improved mood and energy levels. This probiotic can help relieve the following: symptoms of gas and bloating, constipation indigestion, irregularity, leaky gut, and diarrhea induced by antibiotics.


†† 20% savings will automatically apply to cart; minimum order threshold before any applicable sales tax and shipping charges are applied; valid on Puritan's Pride® brands which consist of the following: Nature Smart, Puritan's Pride®, Myology™, Bioorganic Life™, Herbal Authority®, Organic Health, Perfectly Pure, Temptique®, Puritan's Pride Specific Care™, Puritan’s Pride® Pets, Puritan’s Pride Fitness®, Good ‘N Natural; cannot be combined with any additional coupon or 3rd party cash back offers; not valid on orders greater than 1,000 USD; not valid on prior purchases; certain products may be excluded; expires 4/4/2019.
Digestive problems. The best evidence for probiotics is for reducing diarrhea, especially following antibiotic use. A 2010 review from the Cochrane Collaboration concluded that probiotics shorten episodes of acute infectious diarrhea. And in 2011, a Health Canada monograph stated that products containing certain probiotics (such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) help manage acute infectious diarrhea and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. A 2012 research review in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that probiotics reduced the risk of antibiotic-associated diarrhea by 42 percent—but many of the studies had flaws, so these findings should be interpreted with caution. A 2013 Cochrane review of 23 trials also concluded that probiotics may be effective for preventing antibiotic-related diarrhea. However, two large, well-designed studies, in the Lancet in 2013 and the Annals of Internal Medicine in 2014, found that probiotics were no better than a placebo in preventing diarrhea in older people taking antibiotics. A review of 19 studies, published in Gastroenterology in 2017, found that probiotics reduce the risk of Clostridium difficile-related diarrhea in hospital patients, especially when the supplements were started during the first two days of antibiotic treatment.

In the last few years, spending on probiotic products has been climbing steadily in the United States. Many people use probiotics as a complementary or alternative medicine to maintain good digestive health and prevent disease. However, scientific evidence of their benefits is somewhat limited — a number of well-designed clinical trials are under way.

The scientists discovered that the probiotics successfully colonized the GI tracts of some people, called the "persisters," while the gut microbiomes of "resisters" expelled them. Moreover, the persister and resister patterns would determine whether probiotics, in a given person, would impact their indigenous microbiome and human gene expression. The researchers could predict whether a person would be a persister or resister just by examining their baseline microbiome and gut gene expression profile.
Many studies have shown that probiotics reduce diarrhea associated with taking antibiotics in both adults and children. In fact, it is common for physicians and pharmacists to recommend eating a probiotic-fortified yogurt every day during a course of antibiotics to prevent diarrhea. More research is needed to determine which probiotics are associated with the greatest effect for specific antibiotics.
On my recent trip to Japan, one thing I noticed was the inclusion of pickled vegetables in almost every traditional Japanese meal. Unfortunately, many Americans don’t consume enough of these probiotic-rich foods and drinks. Even when they do, restoring equilibrium oftentimes requires therapeutic doses of these microorganisms, because most everyone has been on several rounds of antimicrobials. That’s where a probiotic supplement comes in.
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